Resources

This Declaration recognises the legitimacy of human rights work and the need for these activities and those who carry them out to be protected. It articulates existing rights contained in the major human rights instruments, such as the right to freedom of expression, association and assembly, as they apply to the situation of human rights defenders. It also outlines that not only States, but also non-State actors (such as corporations and “fundamentalist” groups), have the duty to protect human rights defenders against any violence, retaliation and intimidation as a consequence of their human rights work.
What is sexual content on the internet? What are sexuality and sexual rights? Which communications rights are critical for people's sexual rights? What are the most common threats to people's sexual rights? What are some of the methods and impacts of censorship of "sexual content" on the internet? These and other issues are highlighted by the media brief published by APC as part of the EroTICs research.
How is the internet a key public sphere for the struggle for sexual citizenship and the exercise of sexual rights? What is its value to a diversity of users, especially those most marginalised or discriminated against because of their sexual, gender or other forms of social identity? Why do arguments for the regulation of the internet anchor on the moral imperative to regulate sexuality? Who are the key actors influencing processes of decision making, and what are the ways in which the potentially liberatory impact of the internet is being constricted and narrowed? The 3 year EROTICS research project delves into the complex world of sexuality and internet regulation, and uncovers interesting insights to these questions from Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the US. The full research findings and a synthesis chapter is presented in this report.
This paper assesses the impact of a social outsourcing initiative operated by the government of Kerala State, India. Part of this outsources information technology (IT) services to dozens of cooperatives of women from below-poverty-line families in order to improve their socio-economic status. While raising questions about sustainability of the initiative, the research finds that social outsourcing has delivered new jobs, incomes and empowerment into low-income communities.
The report collects inputs from the workshop organized by IT for Change in April 2011 in New Delhi. The workshop was the part of Asia-wide research programme 'Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society (CITIGEN)' and brought together researchers, scholars and practitioners to share their views on democracy and women's participation, new articulations of citizenship in the information society and other issues at stake. The CITIGEN programme seeks to inform policy and practice through research and focuses on five thematic areas: local resistance and global solidarities; emancipation and the neo-liberal feminine subject; gender and public discourse in the emerging public spheres; new paradigms of local governance and participatory development; and technology governance and gender politics.
APC calls on states to brings attention to emerging threats to women's freedom of expression and emerging forms of violence on the internet that impact on women's rights.The Statement is part of a set of recommendations submitted to the Human Rights Council in preparation for its seventeenth regular session (30 May – 17 June 2011).
This document defines ten key rights and principles recommended to form the basis of internet governance. They have been compiled by the Internet Rights and Principles Dynamic Coalition (IRP), an open network of individuals and organisations working to uphold human rights in the Internet environment. The principles are rooted in international human rights standards, and derive from the coalition's emerging Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet.
First developed in 2001-2002 by APC members and partner organisations at Internet Rights workshops held in Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa and updated in 2006, the APC Internet Rights Charter enshrines the rights of people and organisations to use the internet freely, particularly in their work for social, economic and environmental justice. The Charter refers specifically to the internet; however, these principles are relevant to all other information and communication technologies (ICTs), including telephone, radio, and others.
APC calls on states to repeal laws which criminalise online freedom of expression and to cease interference with freedom of expression by means which violate international human rights standards. The Statement emphasises that women’s human rights must be respected and protected and their rights to freedom of expression and association must not be restricted. The Statement is part of a set of recommendations submitted to the Human Rights Council in preparation for its seventeenth regular session (30 May – 17 June 2011).