Resources

The transcript of the 'Protecting women’s rights: Internet content from a gender perspective' workshop co-organized by APC WNSP and Council of Europe at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Vilnius, Lithuania on September 17, 2010. This workshop explored the importance of applying a gender perspective to internet content, discussions around harmful content and content regulation.
The transcript of the 'Dynamic Coalition on Gender' meeting at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Vilnius, Lithuania on September 17 2010. The Dynamic Coalition on Gender Equality aims to ensure gender perspective is included in the key debates around internet governance issues, such as content regulation, privacy, access, freedom of expression among others. Among others, the coalition has promoted women's visibility at the IGF.
Conversation on #gender peripheries of the Internet Governance Forum in Vilnius (#igf10) shared on Twitter.
The transcript of the 'Sexual rights, openness and regulatory systems' workshop co-organized by APC WNSP, Centre for Internet and Society and Alternative Law Forum at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Vilnius, Lithuania on September 14 2010. The workshop presented opinions from various stakeholders on the competing rights and interests on the topic of sexual rights and openness. It examined the values and ways different users negotiate with internet content and risks, and the impact and potential of regulatory mechanisms in the recognition and realisation of sexual rights and gender equality.
The statement of the IGF Dynamic Coalition on Gender submitted at the fourth Internet Governance Forum in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, on December 2009.
In 16 slides x 16 seconds, Take Back The Tech! presentation narrates the story of how violence against women and ICTs links together in Malaysia. The presentation builds on the paper Malaysia: Violence against Women and Information Communication that , provides a snapshot and baseline on the law and policy in these two areas. The paper is part of the APC WNSP project 'MDG3: Take Back the Tech! to end violence against women' that connects ICTs, VAW and Millennium Development Goal Three (MDG3) in practice, policy and law.
In the context of a country with one of the world's worst human rights records, women and girls are the victims of sexual violence perpetrated mostly by combatants from both sides. However, Sylvie Niombo finds in this paper that the intersections between violence against women and girls and ICTs in the DRC are not well established. The internet makes it possible to share experiences and receive information to advance the cause of women’s rights but can facilitate violence towards Congolese women and girls. A lack of confidence in the legal system and the strong presence of men in the judiciary make women unlikely to seek help from the courts, but there is growing mobilisation of women and human rights organisations in the fight to end violence against women (VAW) in partnership with the United Nations and international organisations.
Jessica Umanos Sotos explores why specific law is needed in the Philippines to prosecute perpetrators of violence against women through the use of ICTs or cyberspace. She argues that national ICT institutions and private companies’ policies cannot remain blind to the violations to women’s rights perpetuated via ICTs in the context of the violation of privacy rights through the illicit production and distribution of private and intimate activities. The violation of privacy rights comes in the form of sex-video scandals via telephony and internet. She also documents how, although there are no available studies on how other forms of violence such as stalking or sexual harassment and even direct threats are figuring as VAW via mobile phones, these violations are believed to be widespread