Resources

Aramanzan Madanda, Berna Ngolobe and Goretti Zavuga Amuriat look at how ICTs have been used to help provide spaces for women and sexual minorities. Sexual minorities have a presence on the internet to articulate concerns of members and raise awareness. Women’s mobile phone use is controlled by their husbands, who either give or withold permission to use and dictate when and how. Some women have acquired two SIM cards to forestall domestic violence. The authors view this as a sign of women’s empowerment as telephones provide a means through which to break male control by opening contacts to the outside world.
This article examines the relationships that exist between gendered access to education and the ways in which mobile phones, fixed phones, and the Internet are perceived and used in a rural and an urban Bhutanese community. The findings, organized by levels of literacy, reveal similar patterns in ICT perceptions and use across the two communities.
This article explores the potential impact of Google Inc.'s AdWords advertising policy update on access to critical information on women's sexual reproductive health.
This policy review is produced by Mabel Bianco and Andrea Mariño as part of the APC WNSP <a href="http://www.apc.org/en/projects/erotics-exploratory-research-project-sexuality-and" target="_blank">EROTICS: Exploratory Research on Sexuality and the Internet</a> project. This document is intended for the development of the EROTICS' research policy framework and scope.
This literature review produced by Manjima Bhattacharjya and Maya Indira Ganesh is part of the APC WNSP <a href="http://www.apc.org/en/projects/erotics-exploratory-research-project-sexuality-and" target="_blank">EROTICS: Exploratory Research on Sexuality and the Internet</a> project. This document is intended for the development of the EROTICS' research framework and approach.
The African Copyright & Access to Knowledge (ACA2K) Project examines the relationship between national copyright environments and access to knowledge in African countries. The project is probing this relationship within an access to knowledge (A2K) framework - a framework which regards the protection/promotion of user access as one of the central objectives of copyright law. The project works in eight countries, Eygpt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa and Uganda.
Articles on intellectual property rights in Africa have been brought together by the International Environmental Law Research Centre. The site includes papers translated from Arabic, and topics covered include traditional knowledge, farmers rights, patents and comparisons between intellectual property regimes in different parts of Africa.
This paper examines the discussion on intellectual property rights (IP) for traditional knowledge (TK) in medicine from a gender perspective. It argues that a gender analysis of these issues adds to the understanding of how trade decisions can have important and unintended impacts on the lives of disempowered people.
The statement of the IGF Dynamic Coalition on Gender presented at the third Internet Governance Forum in Hyderabad, India,on the 6 of December 2008.