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The findings of this research indicates there were attempts to identify and eliminate gender disparities in access and use of ICT within the Uganda national ICT policy development process. However clear-cut gender incorporation strategy was missing, and the ICT policy process was largely dominated by men. This The report includes a set of recommendations how to further enhance gender equality within ICT policy process for policy makers and gender advocates.
Willie Currie outlines the current financing trends and challenges in the ICTD sector at the panel “Communication Rights for Women - Why the Purse feels empty? Financing for women's equitable access to Information and Communication Technologies”, organised by APC WNSP, UN DAW and IWTC during the 52nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York in February 2008.
Mavic Cabrera-Balleza, a senior program associate in the International Women's Tribune Centre, looks at the role of ICTs in supporting women's groups efforts to secure funding at the panel, “Communication Rights for Women - Why the Purse feels empty?: Financing for women's equitable access to Information and Communication Technologies”. This panel was organised by APC WRP, UN DAW and IWTC during the 52nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York in February 2008.
Ireen Dubel, a programme manager for Gender, Women & Development in HIVOS, share HIVOS' perspective on the importance of financing ICT in the context of women's rights. This was presented at the panel “Communication Rights for Women - Why the Purse feels empty?: Financing for women's equitable access to Information and Communication Technologies”, organised by APC WNSP, UN DAW and IWTC during the 52nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York in February 2008.
Radhika Lal, a policy advisor on ICT for poverty reduction and the Millenium Development Goals (MDG) in the UNDP, presents her views on effective financing mechanisms to progress gender equality in the information society. This was presented at the panel “Communication Rights for Women - Why the Purse feels empty?: Financing for women's equitable access to Information and Communication Technologies”, organised by APC WNSP, UN DAW and IWTC during the 52nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York in February 2008.
Willie Currie, APC Communications and Information Policy Programme Manager, speaks about current financing trends and challenges in the ICT for development (ICTD) sector during the panel “Communication Rights for Women - Why the Purse feels empty?: Financing for women's equitable access to Information and Communication Technologies”. The panel was organised by APC WNSP, UN DAW and IWTC at the 52nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women in New York in February 2008.
In 2004, the Task Force on Financial Mechanisms, convened by the UNDP in response to a World Summit on Information Society (WSIS) mandate, conducted extensive consultations, research, and reviews of information surrounding the role and effectiveness of financial mechanisms to support ICT for development. Although the report does not look at gender in particular, it highlights several governmental and civil society initiatives which aimed at benefiting women, and calls for more and better coordinated interventions in this area.
In 2006, the Uganda Women Caucus on ICT (UWCI) together with WOUGNET as its secretariat conducted an assessment of the Rural Communications Development Fund (RCDF) from a gender perspective. The focus was to look at the project selection criteria, to examine the benefits of the supported projects to both men and women, to assess the contribution of the supported projects in reducing gender gaps, and finally to make recommendations as well as suggest ways for gender inclusion based on the findings.
This paper attempts to look at some of the paradoxes that emerge in content regulation discussions. It brings in feminist or gendered perspective, which provides different and varied understandings of “harmful content”, as well as opens the question of adequate representation of all voices in the content regulations debates.