India

Impact for what and for whom? Digital technologies and feminist movement building

Lulú Barrera on 6 Nov 2017
Lulú Barrera(Luchadoras, Mexico) recorded a video of Srilata Batliwala (CREA, India) talking about movements, feminism, and disruption at the Making a Feminist Internet meeting in Malaysia in early October. This video and the short piece are to be read together as a dialogue between Srilatha Batliwala and “Primavera Violeta”.

[COLUMN] Sanitary Panels on Mansplaining

Sanitary Panels on 25 Oct 2017
Sanitary Panels is ironic yet hard hitting, where social commentary masquerades as a web comic and makes us rethink many of our assumptions. Here the comic explores aspects of gender and technology including discrimination faced by women in STEM education and careers.

[COLUMN] How womxn in the global south are RECLAIMING SOCIAL MEDIA to shine the spotlight on disability

Samukelisiwe Mabaso on 10 Oct 2017
Womxn in global south are making revolutionary uses of social media, and this includes people challenging casual and everyday ableism. In her column Samukelisiwe Mabaso looks at three amazing projects from different countries that are revolutionizing how disability is talked about - how they are changing language, discourse and perceptions

[COLUMN] How womxn in the Global South are RECLAIMING SOCIAL MEDIA to celebrate being queer

Samukelisiwe Mabaso on 22 Sep 2017
In her third column, Samukelisiwe Mabaso explores how groups and people, artists and performers who are lesbian, gay, bisexual are using the internet and social media to spread messages about love, diversity, and acceptance. This includes projects like Coalition for African Lesbians, Gaysi, Ahwaa and others.

[SPECIAL EDITION] Debrahmanizing Online Sphere: On Larger Questions of Caste, Gender and Patriarchy

Dr. Smita M.Patil on 8 Sep 2017
A powerful discourse around ‘digitally empowered society’ and ‘knowledge economy’ have been added to the neoliberal Indian vocabulary, while access to basic quality education, teachers, schools, infrastructure and so on are still major issues faced by the underprivileged in India. Identities are being formed around new interactive practices, particularly for young Dalit women. This article probes the ways in which caste, gender and ideology/practices of technology are interlinked in India.

Resisting Aadhaar, Resisting Islamophobia: A critical look at debates and litigation around Aadhaar

Mythri Prasad-Aleyamma on 19 Jul 2017
As the Supreme Court of India determines the contours of the right to privacy and who in Indian territory has it, Mythri Prasad-Aleyamma critiques many of the assumptions around the opposition to Aadhar. This critique is grounded in the differences of how surveillance and privacy are known and experienced by those who are vulnerable for varied reasons, but especially those who are migrants or Muslim.

Gendering Surveillance

GenderIT.org on 23 May 2017
Surveillance powers of the state and corporations are escalating and are hugely assisted by information technology. Under regimes of colonialism and patriarchy, women, minorities and all other subjects have experienced being surveilled, enumerated and categorised. There is a need to now relook at how gender is implicated in surveillance practices in the contemporary. In this resource, Internet Democracy Project introduces a conceptual understanding of gender and surveillance, and 3 cases studies on mobile phones and access, safety apps for women and CCTV camera on women garment workers.

Technology-mediated Violence against Women in India: Discussion paper

GenderIT.org on 9 May 2017
The purpose of this issue paper is to lay out the key legal, institutional and ethical issues concerning technology-mediated Violence against Women (VAW), to raise critical questions for further deliberation and action. This paper draws upon secondary literature in this area, and inputs from Indian feminist scholars and practitioners working in the domains of gender-based violence, women’s rights, digital rights, online violence

Working out access on our own: Community projects, gender and internet

Chinmayi SK on 2 May 2017
As our cities turn smart and countries turn digital the gender gap in terms of internet access is disturbing. The lack of access directly relates to the loss of rights of women and minorities. Sadly there is a long way to go before we close this gap. Chinmayi S K explores projects that attempted in innovative ways to address the digital gender gap online.

Being Dalit, Doing Corporate (Women-in-tech)

Multinational companies often put in place a policy for diversity and inclusiveness at the workplace, but does this guarantee the everyday, actual practice of accepting people from marginalized communities, and especially women from such communities. In this article, Christina Thomas Dhanaraj, examines what it means to be Dalit in corporate India - the continued invisibilising of caste, sexism and gender inequity and the effectiveness (or not) of diversity policies.

Educating, Hiring, and Retaining Women in Technology: A Gendered Enquiry

Radhika Radhakrishnan on 22 Feb 2017
Research suggests that women are underrepresented at every level in technology(McKinsey survey, 2016). Why is this the case? And how do we educate, hire, and retain more women in it? In this article, Radhika Radhakrishnan highlights the underlying realities that women face in technology beyond just a numbers game, and offer insight to such questions by interviewing diverse, pioneering women working in various aspects of the field.

‘There’s someone else just like you’: inside India’s asexuality networks

Shreya Ila Anasuya on 3 Feb 2017
Asexuality is often dismissed as experience or identity, even by those within the medical community. However in recent times the internet has played a valuable role in both affirming the choices of those who identify as asexual, and in building networks of support and conversation. Given that it is still very difficult to speak openly about any sexuality in most physical spaces in India, the internet is the only place where digitally-connected asexual people or aces can safely (and anonymously) speak about their experiences.

[COLUMN] Gender Binary: Second Life, First Loves

Nadika on 30 Jan 2017
In this column, Nadika Nadja explores the world of gaming and how it opened up realms of experience for her. Second Life, an enormous immersive multiplayer game, and many other similar environments on the internet, have been revelatory and powerful spaces for people to discover aspects of themselves, particularly in terms of gender and sexuality. From shame and fear, to play and sex, and to finding comfort zones and support online, Nadika sketches out her journey for us.

In Search of Allies: Interview with TBTT campaigners in India

Smita on 15 Nov 2016
In this set of interviews, Smita Vanniyar speaks to Japleen Pasricha of Feminism in India, and Divya Rajgopal of WhyHate. In separate ways, both these are projects of passion that find ways to reclaim technology for women and also others marginalised on account of gender non-conformity, sexuality, caste, religion and class. They discuss the pros and cons of anonymity, how to address online VAW and how to raise issues that are difficult and troublesome.

Its 2016 and Facebook is still terrified of women's nipples

Japleen on 10 Nov 2016
Facebook's arbitrary policy on women's nipples has angered many, who find their content removed or accounts suspended or banned. Japleen Pasricha writes about being repeatedly 'punished' by Facebook for posting content on the social media platform that is feminist and bold, about young women growing up and even images of protest by women in Manipur against the oppression of the Indian army and the rape of women.
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