Malaysia

[SPECIAL EDITION] There is no opting out.: Indigenous women in Malaysia and questions of access

Serene Lim on 7 Sep 2017
In this article, Serene Lim takes a closer look at how questions of access to the internet relate to the struggles of indigenous people and their movement for rights. Rather than the top-down imposition of connectivity, projects for access should align with their social context and as part of their right to sustainable development and right to equal participation.

A place for all: On being diverse and inclusive @RightsCon

Serene Lim on 28 Apr 2017
More than 1,500 business leaders, civil society advocates, policy makers, lawyers, bloggers, technologists, and users participated in RightsCon Brussels 2017 (March) and there were over 250 sessions related to human rights and technology. Serene Lim explores the ways in which inequity was addressed at the forum, and how exclusion and marginalisation were framed in various sessions.

I delete myself: anonymity and sexuality online

Smita on 23 Aug 2016
The fact that the Internet allows women to be anonymous has greatly aided in increased freedom of expression as well as in combating sexual discrimination, violence as well as domestic abuse. Even with the points in favour of right to anonymity being far and wide, it is not seen as a priority in many countries. Human rights activists and the civil society are only beginning to acknowledge that the lack of anonymity directly infringes on freedom of speech and expression.

Voices from digital spaces: Technology related violence against women

Flavia Fascendini on 27 Mar 2012
Drawing on findings from APC's MDG3: Take Back the Tech! project with women's rights organisations in twelve countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, this paper explores the links between the internet, cell phones and violence against women and illustrates that technology related violence impacts women as seriously as other forms of violence.

16x16: Malaysia

Sonia Randhawa on 3 Aug 2010
In 16 slides x 16 seconds, Take Back The Tech! presentation narrates the story of how violence against women and ICTs links together in Malaysia. The presentation builds on the paper Malaysia: Violence against Women and Information Communication that , provides a snapshot and baseline on the law and policy in these two areas. The paper is part of the APC WNSP project 'MDG3: Take Back the Tech! to end violence against women' that connects ICTs, VAW and Millennium Development Goal Three (MDG3) in practice, policy and law.

Malaysia: Violence against Women and Information Communication Technologies

Jac sm Kee on 2 Jun 2010
Jac SM Kee and Sonia Randhawa highlight forms of VAW that have received recognition in Malaysia and provide the context of ICT development and national policy objectives in this paper. It is not an exhaustive assessment of the current state of VAW, but rather aims to surface some of the interconnections between ICT issues and VAW and areas of potential opportunities for advocacy, as well as looking at related cyber laws and areas of regulation, particularly content regulation, privacy and surveillance.

Malaysian gov't must review laws to free media and information

Jac sm Kee on 2 Jun 2010
The paper outlines various discriminatory practices that have been faced from the laws on media and communications in Malaysia, as compelling reasons why the legislations must be reformed.
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