access to justice

From fear to courage: Talking about technology, violence and justice in Mexico

Florencia Goldsman on 23 Nov 2015
An interview by Florencia Goldsman with research report author Gabriela Polanco and APC’s project coordinator in Mexico Erika Smith explores many of the nuances that emerged from the research. From assessing to what extent technology is an enabler of violence to musing on the various meanings of ‘justice’ for survivors, this conversation takes us behind the scenes of the Mexican edition of the End violence: Women's rights and safety online project.

Unsolicited advice, 18 years and menstruation

Tarryn Booysen on 20 Apr 2015
DJ's choice is a weekly section by GenderIT.org, exploring the depths of the web to provide you once a week with a top 5 of creative, interesting and informative pieces and resources on gender and ICTs. Delight yourself with this selection of “sparks”: Good readings, interesting links, videos, pictures, cool authors to point to, amazing tools, and much more. Send us interesting material to genderit at apcwomen.org or tweet us your links using #genderit.

Republic of Congo: Building access to justice, health care and social rehabilitation for survivors

Sylvie Nyombo on 6 Apr 2015
This publication, which is especially useful for women’s rights and ICT for development organisations, UN agencies, health providers, legislators, policy makers and justice enforcement bodies, gathers the learnings and challenges identified by all of the actors involved in APC and AZUR Development’s project “Holding government accountable to gender-based violence in the Republic of Congo”.

Infographic: Mapping technology-based violence against women - Take Back the Tech! top 8 findings

APC on 6 Mar 2015
Did you know that women between 18-30 years old (and younger) are the ones most vulnerable online? And did you know that the majority (40%) of cases are perpetrated by someone known to the survivor? Check out this infographic that draws on the 1126 cases reported on the Take Back the Tech! online map from 2012 to 2014.

From impunity to justice: Domestic legal remedies for cases of technology-related violence against women

on 6 Mar 2015
The present research seeks to examine the availability and effectiveness of existing domestic legal remedies for survivors of technology-related VAW to access justice and to prevent such violence from occurring. This research was carried out between April 2013 and June 2014 by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) as part of a multi-country project entitled “Ending violence: Women’s rights and safety online”.

From impunity to justice: Improving corporate policies to end technology-related violence against women

Rima S. Athar on 6 Mar 2015
Between April 2013 and June 2014, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) carried out a multi-country research project entitled “Ending violence: Women’s rights and safety online”. The project explored the adequacy and effectiveness of domestic legal remedies and corporate policies/redress mechanisms to address the issue of technology-related violence against women (VAW).

Infographic: 4 reasons women struggle to access justice in tech-based VAW

APC on 6 Mar 2015
Did you know that less than half of reported cases of technology-based violence against women (VAW) are investigated by the authorities? Check this infographic to know more about our "From impunity to justice: Exploring corporate and legal remedies for technology-related violence against women" research findings.

Submission to the UPR: Women’s access to justice in the Philippines

on 4 Apr 2012
The submission to the UPR process elaborated by the Women´s Legal and Human Rights Bureau, Inc from the Philippines addresses the issue of women’s access to justice in the country, which highlights technology-related violence against women (VAW) as an emerging form of VAW. The submission also looks at the gaps and challenges in available domestic remedies to survivors of violence and abuse against women online, criticizing that existing laws on VAW do not guarantee the prosecution of technology-related VAW. It further highlights the importance of women’s access to the internet and their representation in policy processes as integral to their right to access to justice.
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