economy

"We cannot be what we cannot see": Mapping gaps in research in gender and information society

GenderIT.org on 10 Sep 2017
The articles in this bilingual edition point to how visibility of our bodies and our stories is the starting point of a different way of being. The stories we tell of struggles and perseverance, of movements and solidarity – entangled as they are in the fine wires of technology – are necessary and essential and could be the foundations for the movement for change. This edition is not exhaustive of the gaps in the research of gender and information society, but we hope it is a starting point – a launch pad – into what has not yet been explored. Because we cannot be what we cannot see.

IGF Best practice forum on Gender and Access (2016): Overcoming barriers to enable women's meaningful internet access

on 13 Jun 2017
The BPF is collaborating with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the UN University on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) in its important endeavour to research and map projects and initiatives that aim to address different gender digital divides around the world. The objective of this collaborative data-gathering process is to help stakeholders better understand women and girls’ diverse needs in accessing and using the Internet, promoting gender equality, and investigating how ICTs can be leveraged to empower women and girls in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

A Woman Coder's Journey (Women-in-tech)

GenderIT.org on 23 Feb 2017
Judith Owigar speaks about her journey entering into tech spaces, and also about their work with Akirachix in Kenya helping other women along the same journey marked by trials, exclusions and success. While speaking about the barriers of education in science and technology (STEM), she says that what inspires her work in many forums around women in tech in Africa, is that eventually a woman should have the space to make her own choices.

Beyond the offline-online binary – why women need a new global social contract

Anita Gurumurthy on 13 Dec 2016
The non-territorial, transborder Internet has added layers of complexity to the human rights debate. The idea of substantive equality – a compass for human rights and the key to gender justice – must be interpreted anew and afresh, as the force of digital technologies complicates the nature of social relations and institutions. The easy binary divisions of online and offline cease to make sense in an increasingly digitised world.

Feminist Principles of the Internet [2016]

APC on 3 Oct 2016
A feminist internet works towards empowering more women and queer persons – in all our diversities – to fully enjoy our rights, engage in pleasure and play, and dismantle patriarchy. This integrates our different realities, contexts and specificities – including age, disabilities, sexualities, gender identities and expressions, socioeconomic locations, political and religious beliefs, ethnic origins, and racial markers. The following key principles are critical towards realising a feminist internet.

Digital dividens - World Development Report 2016

on 31 Mar 2016
Digital technologies have spread rapidly in much of the world. Digital dividends—the broader development benefits from using these technologies—have lagged behind. In many instances digital technologies have boosted growth, expanded opportunities,and improved service delivery. Yet their aggregate impact has fallen short and is unevenly distributed.

How technology issues impact women’s rights: 10 points on Section J

APC on 9 Mar 2015
APC's advocacy for the re-prioritisation of Section J at the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women asks governments to recognise the critical role that the media and ICT play in both advancing and stifling women's rights. At the same time, it is vital that women's rights activists and organisations examine how ICT affects their work and take up Section J demands. To that end, 10 Points on Section J describes ICT's growing impact on a variety of issues related to women's rights, from access and agency to economics and ecology. Learn more about each of the 10 issues and related demands and draw on this resource as you work to inject gender equality into all aspects of media and technology, increasing women's ability to fully enjoy their rights online and off.
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