#fbrape

Freedom of expression: Where do we set the lines

Francoise Mukuku on 7 Oct 2013
The second African Internet Governance Forum started in Nairobi, Kenya just a day after a terrorist attack was launched on this African country. The media reported 24 hours a day from the site of the attack; Twitter hashtags were created to make sure messages related to the crisis were passed on to the masses; and Facebook ready-to-use pictures of support to Kenya were circulated. It was actually a valuable experience for freedom expression defenders, as they were able to analyse how human beings exercised their rights in a time of shock and where the limit is set.

Tweets for Women: Reflections on Challenging Misogyny Online

Nadine Moawad on 8 Aug 2013
Digital feminist activists have been following closely a campaign to demand clearer and more effective Twitter policies on sexually violent tweets. A number of activists have consistently brought this issue forward following alarming attacks and threats, most recently with Caroline Criado-Perez whose successful campaign to get a woman’s face on British bank notes brought about a wave of violent tweets including rape threats. This seems like rather drastic a reaction. All this hate for having Jane Austen’s face on a ten pound note? Perhaps the issue is less about the topic at hand and more about the misogyny that we allow to prosper in online spheres and offline spheres alike.

Facebook, are you leaning in?

on 7 Aug 2013
I was at BlogHer'13 this year, for those who don't know, <a href="http://www.blogher.com/">BlogHer</a> is one of the largest gathering of women bloggers in North America. Apart from being one of panelists for International Activists, I had the opportunity to meet a lot of keynote speakers in person, not limited to Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook. The reason I decided to talk about Sheryl as she claims to be a "feminist" in addition to being a businesswoman. In her keynote at BlogHer'13, she said that she believed that it was indeed possible and that after writing her book, Lean IN, she has indeed changed the discourse of conversation of sexism.

Transparency and accountability: Finding points of agreement following the #fbrape campaign

Shawna Finnegan on 13 Jun 2013
Last month a coalition of women's organisations led a campaign to hold Facebook accountable for its content policy. In particular, how it deals with hateful speech and representations of gender-based violence shared by its users. In response, freedom of expression advocates have expressed concern and criticism over the precedent set by demands for Facebook to remove hateful content from its site. This has spurred debate over gender-based hate speech, the interdependence of human rights, and the impact of sexist online culture. Debate over how to balance freedom of expression with the right to protection from incitement to discrimination is constantly being reframed in the context of new technologies and political realities. Despite this ongoing debate, there is clear space for agreement on the need for transparency and accountability in how Facebook and other internet intermediaries deal with abusive content, and takedown requests. This point has been made by advocates from a variety of backgrounds, including the UN Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression.

#fbrape is about gender-based hate speech, not about censorship

Chat Garcia Ramilo on 13 Jun 2013
On May 21 more than a hundred organisations lead by "Women, Action & the Media”:http://womenactionmedia.org/, the journalist Soraya Chemaly, and “The Everyday Sexism Project":http://www.everydaysexism.com/ started a campaign to “Take action to end gender-based violence on Facebook":http://www.womenactionmedia.org/facebookaction/. Within a week, "Facebook accepted":https://www.facebook.com/notes/facebook-safety/controversial-harmful-and-hateful-speech-on-facebook/574430655911054 weaknesses and lapses in implementing their policies and their own community standards and committed to take steps to improve their content policy in identifying and removal of gender-based violent content on their platform. But not all advocates of freedom on expression online celebrated with us, arguing that Facebook should not be in the business of censoring content even if it is hate speech. This is not a new debate. It is a debate that feminists, who care deeply about freedom of expression, have faced around issues of misogyny and gender-based violent content. What is new is how these arguments play out online. What is crystal clear to those of us who are backing this campaign is that this is not a call to counter the right of users to free expression. The network of women's organisations behind this action understand that internet freedoms are critical to asserting women's rights and are staunch advocates of freedom of expression online and offline.

How women around the world are taking part in combating gender-based hate speech on Facebook

Nighat Dad on 13 Jun 2013
Sexist, gender-based violent speech is a norm today. Sign in, check your home page and somewhere on that or over the timeline you’ll be linked to a page or a photo which only serves to demean the existence of woman. What’s worse is finding some of your friends making jokes about it. But should that be a norm too? Finding your friends making rape and other gender-based jokes? No, it’s NOT funny! Stand up and shout out, haven’t we taken enough already?

The false paradox: freedom of expression and sexist hate speech

Margarita Salas on 10 Jun 2013
The campaign “Take action to end gender-based violence on Facebook” has re-opened up debate among internet rights advocates about the right to freedom of expression and responsibilities of internet intermediaries in regarding the content that circulates through their services. Margarita Salas, who is currently doing research consultancy of internet intermediaries corporate policies for APC's End Violence project, is looking in her blog at gender-based hate speech in the context of various international instruments and present couple of examples how to deal with cyber hate.

How funny is this, Facebook?

Flavia Fascendini on 28 May 2013
“Take action to end gender-based violence on Facebook” is this campaign’s call that asks companies whose publicity appears on explicitly violent Facebook pages and profiles to help pressure the social networking platform to re-examine its response to violence against women and girls.
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