gigx

What do women expect for this 10th IGF?

Flavia Fascendini on 7 Nov 2015
GenderIT.org asked many of the participants in the Gender and Internet Governance eXchanges (gigX) from three different regions what they expected for this year's 10th Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Brazil, in terms of women's and sexual rights, gender, and internet governance.

Women actively join internet governance discussions

Dafne Sabanes Plou on 4 Nov 2015
Little by little, the number of women participating in the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) has increased significantly, and their presence in panels and workshops and as participants has brought new insights into the discussion of the different matters that are key in IGF debates.

Women’s rights, gender and Internet governance

APC on 30 Oct 2015
This issue paper addresses the degree to which gender and women’s rights feature in Internet1 governance, in multiple interconnected ways including, but certainly not limited to, access, content and representation. Gender and women’s rights occupy a largely rhetorical role in today’s discussion of Internet governance.

Claiming governance spaces: from Gender and Internet Governance Exchange to Africa Internet Governance Forum

Caroline Tagny on 26 Oct 2015
The Association for Progressive Communications' Caroline Tagny interviewed Chenai Chair, a participant of the Africa Gender and Internet Governance Exchange, on her experience.

Meha Jouini: The internet has allowed me to publicly express my identity as an Amazigh woman activist

Leila Nachawati Rego on 1 Oct 2015
Maha Jouini is an Addis Ababa-based Tunisian blogger, and women’s rights and indigenous rights activist, with a special focus on the Amazigh community. APC’s Leila Nachawati met Meha in Addis Ababa during the African School on Internet Governance (AfriSIG) in September and here is what they talked about.

Internet governance: Who sets the rules?

Yvonne Oluoch on 22 Sep 2015
When it comes to decision making, policies and advocacy, in most cases women are usually left behind especially in relation to ICTs. I must say that I am pleased with the representation of women at the African Internet Governance Forum and before I continue I must commend the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) and the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) for making this possible and continuing to give young women and youth opportunities for participating in such forums.

Multi-stakeholderism is about losing: Reflections on working through the AfriSIG practicum

Natasha Msonza on 7 Sep 2015
‘Multi-stakeholderism is about losing.’ I first heard this statement on the first day of the African School on Internet Governance (AfriSIG) in Dr David Souter’s lecture and overview of the Internet governance ecosystem and its key players

Exchange moment

Chioma Phibe Nwaodike on 7 Sep 2015
It all started a couple of weeks ago when the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) invited me to apply for participation in an exchange with women’s rights, internet rights and sexual rights activists to discuss, exchange and build awareness and understanding of the relationship between gender, women’s rights and internet governance. I had not realized that at end of it, I would not be afraid to call myself a feminist.

The experience of complexities and dynamics in public policy making

Loyce Kyogabirwe on 5 Sep 2015
It is on again! The third African School on Internet Governance (AfriSIG) kicked off on Tuesday September 2015 in Addis Abba. The 2015 #AfriSIG is a diverse and dynamic group of people with different gender identities, expertise and age. Being at the AfriSIG is a whole new experience to me and has made me realise how little I know about the internet and internet governance in particular despite the fact that I use it every day.

Reflections on gender and internet governance in Africa

Chenai Chair on 4 Sep 2015
Before I attended the Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigX) I did not think there was anything I could say related to gender activism. The last four days have reaffirmed the saying shared on the first day “if you are not at the table you will be on the menu”.

‘Governing’ my internet

Atieno Otieno on 4 Sep 2015
I never thought the internet to be knotty. That all I needed was my device of choice, an internet service provider and voila! Get my connection, click, click, click, open up a page, browse through it, close tab, open another, like an update, favorite a tweet, laugh at some memes and move on to the next tab. Nothing is ever that easy.

Internet governance in Africa - #AfriSIG2015 #GIGxAfrica #IGF2015

APC on 3 Sep 2015
In order to strengthen internet governance in Africa, the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) is organising a series of events to take place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, during September 2015. Follow them here.

Barriers to women’s participation on the internet evolve with increased ‘access’

Natasha Msonza on 3 Sep 2015
In the opening session at this year’s Gender and Internet Governance eXchange (gigXAfrica), participants highlighted some key questions they had that they hoped would be answered during the exchange. One participant innocently asked: if the internet is free for all, how are women really marginalized in that space? This is my attempt at a calm response to this question that I am slowly realising occupies the minds of many.

Participation in the gigX and APrIGF in Macau: Learning and experience

Sajia Afreen Smita on 8 Aug 2015
As the representative of Take Back the Tech! Bangladesh I took the opportunity to give a presentation on the topic- ‘Consent, autonomy and agency: Online violence’ from a Bangladeshi perspective. Case studies of online violence in Bangladesh, government initiatives, campaigns of Take Back the Tech! Bangladesh have been discussed in the presentation.

Ladder of Hierarchy: how gender matters in internet governance

Pinda Phisitbutra on 17 Jul 2015
In the Gender and Internet Governance Exchange (gigX) workshop last month participants from different countries in Asia were asked to arrange a series of words by the “ladder of hierarchy”. Despite our cultural differences, it seemed that we all agreed on one thing – whether married or unmarried - man is always on top.
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