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Toxic Twitter: Amnesty International report on social media and online violence

Azmina Dhrodia on 18 Jun 2018
Twitter, in particular, can be a powerful tool for women to make connections and express themselves - from high-level female politicians to journalists, activists, writers and bloggers, to women who simply want to know what’s happening around them. It is allegedly the space where ‘every voice has the power to impact the world’. But as revealed by the report by Amnesty International, Twitter is also a platform where violence and abuse against women flourishes, often with little accountability. This article gives the main highlights from the report "Toxic Twitter"

Gender, Labour, Technology

GenderIT.org on 23 Feb 2017
This edition on gender, labour, technology examines how gendered labour is embedded in the making of digital devices in the hardware industries spread across Asia, how inequities of gender and other dynamics of caste, race, ethnicity continue to play a role in allegedly emancipated corporate spaces across the globe, and the disturbing strands of gendered labour of volunteering and managing even in movements. Rightly so it is pointed out by many who were interviewed that it is not necessary that digital technology or the internet in and of itself plays a role in empowering women and gender non conforming people, but that it can be one of myriad tools in this long struggle.

Being Dalit, Doing Corporate (Women-in-tech)

Multinational companies often put in place a policy for diversity and inclusiveness at the workplace, but does this guarantee the everyday, actual practice of accepting people from marginalized communities, and especially women from such communities. In this article, Christina Thomas Dhanaraj, examines what it means to be Dalit in corporate India - the continued invisibilising of caste, sexism and gender inequity and the effectiveness (or not) of diversity policies.
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