access and beyond

[COLUMN] Access and Beyond (5): How do we address the gender question?

Chenai Chair on 17 Aug 2017
In this last column by Chenai Chair following the gender implications of the research by Research ICT Africa on access, she explores how researchers and activists can proactively explore gender dimensions. Even as ITU figures point to a progressively increasing gender digital divide, there are steps to take to understand and address this divide.

[COLUMN] Access and beyond (4): Gendered barriers to internet use

Chenai Chair on 14 Jul 2017
Gendered barriers to internet access can range from social and cultural barriers imposed within family or by partners to extraneous factors relevant to all - such as affordability of data and devices. In this column Chenai Chair examines the specificity of how access is different for women and men.

[COLUMN] Access and Beyond (3): Navigating mobile costs in communication

Chenai Chair on 15 Jun 2017
Africa is flooded with zero rating services such as Free Basics (Facebook’s zero rating scheme) and other subsidised data strategies. Do these schemes make internet more affordable and bring access to more people? In this column Chenai Chair examines whether ordinary people perceive such schemes as useful.

[COLUMN] Access and Beyond (2): Motivations for internet use

Chenai Chair on 11 May 2017
In this column, Chenai Chair explores motivations of internet use through the ResearchICT Africa study in Rwanda, Nigeria, Kenya and South Africa. Business, local and global communication, social ties, and curiosity seem to be the main motivators. By understanding why people go online, we can better shape interventions for a connected society.

[COLUMN] Access and beyond (1): Navigating the gendered cyberspace

Chenai Chair on 12 Apr 2017
In this column series, Chenai Chair explores the barriers to accessing the internet in four countries in Africa - Rwanda, Nigeria, South Africa and Kenya. The study in particular looks at the impact of affordability of internet and subsidised data services, and what impact this has on people in different locations (countries, urban-rural), of different genders, and so on. In the first column, Chenai examines what kind of methodology is suited for research on access.
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