Becky Faith's picture

Dr. Becky Faith

Dr. Becky Faith is a Research Fellow and Deputy Leader of the Digital and Technology cluster. Becky’s professional experience and research interests encompass mobile communication studies, human computer interaction and technology for social change.

Becky has fifteen years' strategic and programme experience working in ICT4D and technology for human rights organisations. She started her career in digital start-ups, working on the UK’s first e-commerce platforms in the 1990s. She developed innovative mobile advocacy programmes and training materials for activists in the global South, including the first SMS based petition.

Becky’s PhD focused on the use of mobile phones by young women and she is an international expert in research and strategy on the use of mobile phones in marginalised communities. She has an MSc. in Technology Strategy and Policy Research.

Becky is currently involved in projects researching gender and technology, the application of Agile approaches to Transparency and Accountability initiatives, and forecasting the impacts of digital technologies for development.

Feminist talk

Why we need a ‘feminist digital economics’

Posted Wed 31 Jan 2018 - 12:19 | 2,662 views
In the digital economy, what needs to be further examined and understood is how women, gender non-conforming and other vulnerable groups are impacted. Becky Faith proposes a framework of feminist digital economics to unpack the ways in which gendered labour could be unpaid or not adequately compensated in the current context, and also how ‘the future of work’ including automation and machine-...

Feminist talk

Automation and the future of work: bringing women into the debate

Posted Tue 24 Oct 2017 - 12:56 | 2,582 views
The future of work in a digital economy could vary enormously depending for different people depending on where they live, who they work for or in what industry, and what access to privilege and resources they have. Dr. Becky Faith in this article examines the particular impact that automation and AI might have on gendered, precarious and often poorly paid labour that women usually are engaged in...