‘There’s someone else just like you’:...

Asexuality is often dismissed as experience or identity, even by those within the medical community. However in recent times the internet has played a valuable role in both affirming the choices of those who identify as asexual, and in building networks of support and conversation. Given that it is still very difficult to speak openly about any sexuality in most physical spaces in India, the internet is the only place where digitally-connected asexual people or aces can safely (and anonymously) speak about their experiences.
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Shreya Ila Anasuya

Shreya is an independent writer and activist. She is a part-time digital editor for Point of View...

[COLUMN] Gender Binary: Second Life,...

In this column, Nadika Nadja explores the world of gaming and how it opened up realms of experience for her. Second Life, an enormous immersive multiplayer game, and many other similar environments on the internet, have been revelatory and powerful spaces for people to discover aspects of themselves, particularly in terms of gender and sexuality. From shame and fear, to play and sex, and to finding comfort zones and support online, Nadika sketches out her journey for us.
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Nadika

Nadika is a non-binary person based in Chennai. She writes and edits for a living

Big Data and Sexual Surveillance

Surveillance has historically functioned as an oppressive tool to control women’s bodies and is closely related to colonial modes of managing populations. Big data, metadata and the technologies used to collect, store and analyse them are by no means neutral, but come with their own exclusions and biases. This paper highlights the gendered and racialised effects of data practices; outlines the overlapping nature of state, commercial and peer surveillance; and maps the challenges and opportunities women and queers encounter on the nexus between data, surveillance, gender and sexuality.
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Defining their place: Gender at the...

The Internet Governance Forum has been valuable as a multistakeholder space that facilitates the discussion and dialogue of public policy issues pertaining to the Internet. Over the years several feminists, activists and others interested in diverse representation have been participating in IGF and observing how concerns related to gender, sexuality, and the internet are raised and addressed. Smita Vanniyar writes a short report on IGF 2016 in Guadalajara, Mexico, and how gender and sexuality are still largely a concern for the women activists and queer people present, rather than for all.
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Smita

Smita is a queer feminist, currently working at Point of View, India, on gender, sexuality and...

[COLUMN] Taking action: Making climate...

In the final column on gender, ICTs and climate change, Sonia Randhawa explores what are the possible actions that individuals can take -- in the face of impending climate change and the devastating and inequitable effect it has on people. At an individual level, we can reduce our carbon footprint. We also need to get involved in the climate movement. The climate emergency is with us now, and we need to mobilise to ensure that it forces a better world, rather than a continuation of injustice and reinforcing of inequality.
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Sonia Randhawa

"Sonia Randhawa is a member of GenderIT.org's pool of writer. She is a director of the...

Online privacy through a gendered lens...

The ever-growing advancement of information technology is not without perils. Online privacy has been at stake for a while now. Looking at online privacy through a gendered lens reveals that women are particularly vulnerable because of social, economic and cultural factors. Farhana Akhter looks at the specifics of the law and context in Bangladesh especially the increasing incidents of online violence, illegal surveillance along with legally sanctioned surveillance by the government.
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Farhana Akter

Farhana Akter has been working as Programme Coordinator for VOICE since 2005. She had previously...