The changing face of women's rights activism: be careful what you say online

Jennifer Radloff on 13 Sep 2011
Jennifer Radloff, contributor, and Running Toddler, a participant of a recently hosted workshop in secure online communications for women human rights defenders, interviewed the workshop's trainers, c5 and anonymous. In this first part of the interview, the trainers talk about their experience in training activists and human rights defenders to use technology securely, and the challenges inherent in communicating safely as feminists and women's human rights defenders, and the importance of awareness that these technologies can both serve us and put us at risk.

Secure communications essential to women's rights defenders

Grady Johnson on 29 Aug 2011
Grady speaks to women's human rights defenders from India and Philippines who use ICTs in their work. They share their views how the right to freedom of association is exercised by women through ICTs. Speaking from their own experience, they dispelled some of the common myths surrounding the internet and ICTs use.

Between four walls: sweeping sexual abuse under the carpet

Nighat Dad on 11 Jul 2011
Nighat Dad from the Pakistan MDG3: Take Back the Tech! project documents the story of a girl who sought her advice at the “Take Back The Tech” event, in Peshawar. The girl was 14 years old, and she was sexual abused for the last 6 years.

Social Outsourcing as a Development Tool

Kateřina Fialová on 23 Jun 2011
This paper assesses the impact of a social outsourcing initiative operated by the government of Kerala State, India. Part of this outsources information technology (IT) services to dozens of cooperatives of women from below-poverty-line families in order to improve their socio-economic status. While raising questions about sustainability of the initiative, the research finds that social outsourcing has delivered new jobs, incomes and empowerment into low-income communities.

CITIGEN: April 2011 Review Workshop Report.

Kateřina Fialová on 22 Jun 2011
The report collects inputs from the workshop organized by IT for Change in April 2011 in New Delhi. The workshop was the part of Asia-wide research programme 'Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society (CITIGEN)' and brought together researchers, scholars and practitioners to share their views on democracy and women's participation, new articulations of citizenship in the information society and other issues at stake. The CITIGEN programme seeks to inform policy and practice through research and focuses on five thematic areas: local resistance and global solidarities; emancipation and the neo-liberal feminine subject; gender and public discourse in the emerging public spheres; new paradigms of local governance and participatory development; and technology governance and gender politics.

Gender and citizenship in the information society

on 22 Jun 2011
Arpita Joshi reports on a recent workshop organized by IT for Change, her home organization, in April 2011 in New Delhi. The workshop was the part of Asia-wide research programme 'Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society (CITIGEN)' and brought together researchers, scholars and practitioners to share their views on democracy and women's participation, new articulations of citizenship in the information society and other issues at stake.

Pakistan: Violence against Women and ICT

Kateřina Fialová on 29 Mar 2011
Access to mobile technology is increasing rapidly in Pakistan, and women are also gaining access, albeit at a slower rate than men. Kyla Pasha examines how mobile technology is ripe for use in strategies of empowerment, as long as access to technology is accompanied by training and orientation.

Feminist Tech Exchange - using technology in activism on women's rights (video, 15mins)

Daphne Sabanes Plou on 7 Mar 2011
Dafne Plou presents on how dozens of Feminist Technology Exchanges - a series of capacity building workshops - are building the skills of women's rights organisations to use information and communication technologies in campaigning, monitoring and documentation to end violence against women. This presentation was part of the "Take Back The Tech! Reclaiming technology for women's rights" session at the 55th Commission on the Status of Women, on 25 February 2011.

STOP MOTION PROJECT – When does the violence begin?

Kateřina Fialová on 21 Feb 2011
The three-part video campaign STOP MOTION PROJECT – When does the violence begin? aims to encourage discussion and promote awareness on violence against women through creative storytelling and the use of stop-motion animation. The mission of STOP MOTION PROJECT is to empower and support organisations and individuals in and through the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for the purpose of ending violence against women (VAW).

EROTICS: Exploratory research on sexuality and the internet - summary report

Jac sm Kee on 16 Feb 2011
What is the value of the internet in the exercise of sexual rights? From 2008 to 2010, the EROTICS research sought to answer this question, aiming to bridge the gap between policy and legislative measures that regulate content and practice on the internet, and the actual lived practices, experiences and concerns of internet users in the exercise of their sexual rights. The summary report provides an overview of the research, and surfaces the key areas of concern, interest and findings of five national studies in Brazil, India, Lebanon, South Africa and the United States. They give a compelling glimpse into the richness of the research universe, and the complexity of the subject.

Gender Evaluation Methodology: Helping assess the gender impact of development work

Sonia Randhawa on 15 Feb 2011
“How exactly GEM can influence the discourse at the CSW, I think it is really to challenge the notion of development, or at least how governments understand it. “ The APC’s Angela Kuga Thas speaks with editor about the Gender Evaluation Methodology, what it is and the value it adds to grassroots work on gender and ICTs.

Asia-Pacific: Collecting Data on “Digital” Violence

Lalaine P. Viado on 20 Oct 2010
Lalaine P. Viado reports on the “Workshop on Strengthening National Capacities to Collect Violence Against Women Statistics in the Asia-Pacific Region” which took place on 20-21 September 2010 in Bangkok. The workshop is part of inter-regional efforts to develop indicators to measure violence against women.

Philippines: Violence against women and ICT

Jessica Umanos Soto on 3 Aug 2010
Jessica Umanos Sotos explores why specific law is needed in the Philippines to prosecute perpetrators of violence against women through the use of ICTs or cyberspace. She argues that national ICT institutions and private companies’ policies cannot remain blind to the violations to women’s rights perpetuated via ICTs in the context of the violation of privacy rights through the illicit production and distribution of private and intimate activities. The violation of privacy rights comes in the form of sex-video scandals via telephony and internet. She also documents how, although there are no available studies on how other forms of violence such as stalking or sexual harassment and even direct threats are figuring as VAW via mobile phones, these violations are believed to be widespread

Women, Gender & Media

Jac sm Kee on 2 Jun 2010
When I was a trainer at a media and gender workshop in 2002, the only male participant there confessed, “Our organisation is not prioritising gender actually. We are more concerned about other issues – issues which are political”. This statement reveals much about the stand that most media institutions take on gender.

Cambodia: Violence against Women and Information Communication Technologies on 2 Jun 2010
Chim Manavy examines how growth of the internet is pushing the limits of a society's attitudes towards acceptable media images, through exploitative use of images taken for private consumption. Technology is moving across boundaries faster than the law can address. At the same time, ICT use in general, much less awareness of how ICTs can be strategically used to combat violence against women, is very limited in Cambodia. While other women’s organisations and networks worldwide are already using online resources in a myriad of ways to mobilise support and share experiences, most Cambodian women are not familiar with the use of ICT.
Syndicate content