Asia-Pacific

Pakistan country report: Technology driven violence against women

GenderIT.org on 30 May 2015
Technology based violence is exposing women to the entire spectrum of conceivable harms in Pakistan. Victims of technology based violence have suffered physical violence ranging from rape to attempted assassination, psycho-social harms and loss of development opportunities. This was revealed in a research report launched by Bytes for All, Pakistan in Islamabad.

IGF 2014: Gender Dynamic Coalition taking place on Tuesday 2 September

GenderIT.org on 28 Aug 2014
The Gender Dynamic Coalition meeting will discuss outcomes from key processes and discussions on Internet governance leading up to IGF 2014 – including 2013 IGF Gender Report Card findings, WSIS+10 results, and NetMundial to assess integration of gender issues and concerns. The meeting also launches the new “Feminist Principles of the Internet,” which is a working document produced from a meeting of over 50 women’s and Internet rights activists in April 2014. Panelists and attendees will together develop thinking and analysis around the contentious issues of gender, sexuality, and the Internet, including online violence against women, ‘harmful’ content, ‘hate speech’, and sexual expression.

“A Facebook status can get you arrested faster than killing someone now”

Rafia Shaikh on 23 Nov 2012
In India, the largest democracy on Earth, 21-year old girl Shaheen Dhada was arrested for posting a status update on Facebook questioning the complete shutdown of cities for Bal Thackeray’s (rightwing leader notorious for inciting religious hatred and violence) funeral on Sunday, 18th November. Her friend Renu Srinivas was also arrested for “liking” the update which reportedly read: "People like Thackeray are born and die daily and one should not observe a 'bandh' [shutdown] for that." 

Interview with Arzu Geybullayeva on the internet rights of women in Azerbaijan

Nighat Dad on 9 Nov 2012
Nighat Dad from "Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan":http://www.digitalrightsfoundation.pk speaks to Arzu Geybullayeva, a regional analyst and a blogger from Azerbaijan. Arzu's areas of interest are regional politics, conflict resolution, and new social media. In their "feminist talk” Nighat asks Arzu about her impressions of the 7th Internet Governance Forum, that took place in Baku, and key internet rights issues faced by women in Azerbaijan.

Azerbaijan: When online security is synonymous with personal safety

Zooey Schock on 23 Oct 2012
The Seventh Internet Governance Forum will be taking place in Baku, Azerbaijan from 6 to 9 November 2012. GenderIT.org writer Zooey Schock spoke with veteran activist Dr Leyla Yunus about internet freedom and the ability to organise in post-Soviet Asia.

DELETE, UNDO, RETRIEVE: Statement on the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012

on 10 Oct 2012
The statement developed by the Women's Legal Bureau (WLB) in response to the Cybercrime Bill. WLB highlights the specific women's rights concerns in relation to the bill, in particular warn that the law can be used to further perpetuate violence against women. They are still in the process of gathering support and you are invited to sign on to show your support to the cause.

Philippines: the problematic cybercrime prevention law of 2012

Kateřina Fialová on 8 Oct 2012
The recent passage of the Philippine Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 (or the Republic Act 10175) has elicited strong negative reactions from various stakeholders. Civil society organizations (CSOs), academe, journalists, bloggers, and Filipino netizens have expressed great concern over certain provisions of the law that impinged their constitutional right to freedom of expression. To date, there are ten petitions filed before the Supreme Court, seeking an order to restrain the implementation of the law and/or assailing the constitutionality of the law. This law is said to be the most opposed law in the history of the Philippines.

Emerging forms of violence against women in the Philippines

Flavia Fascendini on 12 Jun 2012
These materials were produced by the Foundation for Media Alternatives from the Philippines as part of APC's MDG3: Take Back the Tech! to end violence against women project between 2011 and 2012. You can find useful materials for awareness raising and training on the subject of violence against women mediated through information and communication technologies, also called eVAW..

The 'Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society' research: Final meeting report

Kateřina Fialová on 10 Apr 2012
The final meeting of the ‘Gender and Citizenship in the Information Society’(CITIGEN) research network was organized by IT for Change in Bangalore in February 2012. The CITIGEN research programme studies whether marginalised women benefit from new information and communication technologies and whether the internet and mobile phones strengthened their active citizenship. The final meeting of the CITIGEN programme was an occasion for the network members and partners to take stock of the work done and to reflect upon the questions framing the research endeavour.

Finding the balance: Women's rights and the internet in the Philippines

Sonia Randhawa on 5 Apr 2012
GenderIT.org writer Sonia Randhawa speak with Jelen Paclarin, executive director of the Women's Legal and Human Rights Bureau (WLB) in the Philippines, about the potential of the UPR to improve the lives of women in Philippines, the emerging forms of technology-related VAW and key challenges in addressing it, and the importance of women's representation in policy-making processes.

Submission to the UPR: Women’s access to justice in the Philippines

on 4 Apr 2012
The submission to the UPR process elaborated by the Women´s Legal and Human Rights Bureau, Inc from the Philippines addresses the issue of women’s access to justice in the country, which highlights technology-related violence against women (VAW) as an emerging form of VAW. The submission also looks at the gaps and challenges in available domestic remedies to survivors of violence and abuse against women online, criticizing that existing laws on VAW do not guarantee the prosecution of technology-related VAW. It further highlights the importance of women’s access to the internet and their representation in policy processes as integral to their right to access to justice.

Mapping the intersection of technology and gender-based violence

Sonia Randhawa on 14 Dec 2011
On 25 November 2011, Take Back The Tech! campaign launched an interactive map that allows internet users to share their stories, local news and personal experiences of gender-based violence they faced online or through the use of mobile phone technologies. As of 7 December, the map has recorded 103 stories from across the globe, with the majority of stories coming from Africa, Latin America and Asia. Sonia Randhawa draws on the data collected through the mapping platform and looks at some of the trends this data reveals to us about technology-related violence against women.

Who's gonna track me?

Flavia Fascendini on 13 Sep 2011
Flavia Fascendini looks at the report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders -- which, for the first time in history, focuses on the situation of women's human rights defenders. Drawing on the report's findings, she talks to South-East Asian women's activists about the unique security risks they face online.

Connectedness or alienation?

ItsAllMaya on 13 Sep 2011
Women's human rights activist Edna Aquino remarks on how ICTs have impacted her work, presenting both new opportunities and new risks. In her interview with new GenderIT.org writer, Maya Ganesh, Edna argues that activists using ICTs must be mindful of alienating women with the use of excessive jargon, and must always be keenly aware that there are inherent risks in online communications. However, she argues that these problems can be remedied through secure online communications training and capacity building.

“Defending yourself means defending your community”

Jennifer Radloff on 13 Sep 2011
In the second part of the interview with c5 and anonymous, the trainers from the secure online communications workshop provide strategies for mitigating some of the dangers for women's human rights defenders. While examining the practices of policy-makers, internet intermediaries and every day users, they conclude that security means more than just awareness -- it requires behavioural change.
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