Smita's picture

Smita

Smita is a queer feminist, currently working at Point of View, India, on gender, sexuality and technology. She holds a Master's degree in Media and Cultural Studies from Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. Her areas of interest include gender, queer studies, internet, technology, popular culture, films and TV shows, fandoms etc. Smita is forever in the search of good coffee.

Feminist talk

The nerdiest and most open of them all: Internet Freedom Festival 2017

Posted Fri 7 Apr 2017 - 09:51 | 2,043 views
The Internet Freedom Festival is refreshingly different from most forums around internet rights and technology - it is almost equal in gender ratio, welcoming of gender non conforming and trans persons, and takes privacy of its participants at the venue seriously. Smita Vanniyar tells us more about their experience at the festival this year in Valencia, Spain.

Feminist talk

Defining their place: Gender at the Internet Governance Forum 2016

Posted Wed 18 Jan 2017 - 18:52 | 2,964 views
The Internet Governance Forum has been valuable as a multistakeholder space that facilitates the discussion and dialogue of public policy issues pertaining to the Internet. Over the years several feminists, activists and others interested in diverse representation have been participating in IGF and observing how concerns related to gender, sexuality, and the internet are raised and addressed....

In depth

In Search of Allies: Interview with TBTT campaigners in India

Posted Tue 15 Nov 2016 - 16:03 | 5,604 views

In this set of interviews, Smita Vanniyar speaks to Japleen Pasricha of Feminism in India, and Divya Rajgopal of WhyHate. In separate ways, both these are projects of passion that find ways to reclaim technology for women and also others marginalised on account of gender non-conformity, sexuality, caste, religion and class. They discuss the pros and cons of anonymity, how to address online VAW...

Feminist talk

I delete myself: anonymity and sexuality online

Posted Tue 23 Aug 2016 - 10:26 | 4,657 views
The fact that the Internet allows women to be anonymous has greatly aided in increased freedom of expression as well as in combating sexual discrimination, violence as well as domestic abuse. Even with the points in favour of right to anonymity being far and wide, it is not seen as a priority in many countries. Human rights activists and the civil society are only beginning to acknowledge that...